Monday, April 28, 2008

Renaissance Era Costumes

India AND Olmec (MesoAmerica)

India AND Olmec* (Mesoamerica)



Ireland
Ireland



Assyria, Arabia, Croatia
Assyria, Arabia, Croatia



Assyria, Arabia, Croatia a
Assyria, Arabia, Croatia



Hungary
Hungary



Italian costumes
Italy



Northern Greece, Ethiopia and Tatar people national costumes
Northern Greece, Ethiopia and Ta(r)tar* people



Palestine
Palestine



Russia, Poland, Finland, Lapland, Croatia
Russia, Poland, Finland, Lapland, Croatia



Russia, Poland, Finland, Moscow, Lapland, Croatia (a)
Russia, Poland, Finland, Moscow, Lapland, Croatia



The Orient
The Orient



Turkey
Turkey



Turkey a
Turkey



Venice
Venice



Greece, Tartar peoples, Iraq, Saracen peoples
Greece, Ta(r)tar peoples, Iraq, Saracen* peoples



'Kostüme der Männer und Frauen in Augsburg und Nürnberg, Deutschland, Europa, Orient und Afrika - BSB Cod.icon. 341' at Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek contains around three hundred hand-painted national costumes produced in the 16th century.

The anonymous manuscript was probabaly created in Augsburg and seems to be one of a very few similar works from around the same time period. There are a couple of scanned pages attached to Cod.icon 341 in German (one, two) with some contextual background - that I can't read of course - but that's about the extent of online references.

The captions above are the rough chapter - country - translations with a little modernising and, in the interests of avoiding any unintended international incidents, should probably be taken with a grain of salt. All the images above were extensively background cleaned which was totally a waste of time. If your model chooses to match red boots with a green and pink silk-lined cape, it's an exercise in futility believing that that ensemble can be saved by any amount of tweaking at the margins. [via Marion McNealy]

10 comments :

Raquel said...

Peacay
it is almost a catalogue of some "Fashion Week"! I'm kidding, the images are beautiful!
Raquel

mordicai said...

I have the Taschen fashion through history book, but this is very, very nice. Thanks!

rdheinritz said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
ngögam said...

The first chapter can't be "Olmec" in the sense of the Wikipedia article, referring to a civilization centuries dead when this manuscript was produced and only identified by archaeologists in the 20th century. It might be the contemporary inhabitants of the same area, with whose Aztec name the ancient Olmecs have been (rather confusingly) labelled.

peacay said...

Someone who mentioned that the Olmec I mean Aztec image came from Wiednitz's book deleted their own comment. Turns out that the 'Trachtenbuch of Christoph Weiditz' is also online at MDZ.
ngögam, I'm sure you're right - I'm as much to blame: the section title actually refers to both Aztec and Olmec (neither name I can really identify handwritten on the mss). Oh well - there's that grain of salt.

lucy tartan said...

red boots with a green and pink silk-lined cape

how did you know what I'm wearing??

peacay said...

Superheroes can obviously get away with anything.

Karla said...

Thoroughly elegant, reminds me of when (long long ago) I painted up a set of lush 15th-century designs for Life is a Dream for my Costume Design class. There weren't any Turks or Croatians in it, but my medieval-underwear costume for the prince-in-seclusion was pretty much like the first two shown here. Except that until I saw the caption, I just sort of assumed these were costumes for Jesus-in-deshabille.

O'Leary said...

Beautiful site!

peacay said...

Thank you Ma'am.

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