Monday, August 21, 2006

Equus

I've added this image later, just because I stumbled across it and
because it's so bizarre (click to enlarge). It's from an 1816 book entitled:
E.D'Alton's 'Naturgeschichte Des Pferdes' from Anna Amalia Bibliothek.
I saw only one other illustration of a skeleton in normal stance.
An earlier edition has interesting schematic sketches.





All the above images are from the 5 volume set:
'Dizionario Ragionato di Veterinaria Teorico-Pratica..'
by Francesco Bonsi, 1795.

'Della Cavalleria' by Georg Engelhard Löhneyss, 1624.

'The Anatomy of the Horse: Finished Drawing of the Muscles
for the Fourth Anatomical Table' 1756-1758 by George Stubbs.

'Anatomia del Cavallo Infermita..' by Carlo Ruini, 1618.

Frontpiece from 'Equile, in Quo Omnis Generis..' by Johanes Stradamus, 1634.
(I'm 99.3% certain this is actually Johannes Stradanus, although he died in 1605
- either this is from a later edition or the engravings are after his drawings)

Frontpiece from 'La Methode et Invention Nouvelle de
Dresser les Chevaux' by William Cavendish, 1658
[published in english as 'A General System of Horsemanship' in 1747]

'Zodiac Horse' from 'Obras de Albeyteria..' by Martín Arredondo, 1704.

'De Humana Physiognomonia Libri IIII' by Giambattista della Porta, 1586.

2 comments:

Rodrigo Ortega said...

Horseback Book Arts (A Caballo Artes del Libro) is the name of my blog... some weeks ago Bibliodyssey is sindicated in my Sage feeds.

And now this comment is the charm and the seduction to take some images for link your site

The name of my blog... is the first operation for embroider the headband of a book. My best wishes and kind regards

kg said...

See the complete works at the French site
http://www.vet-lyon.fr/bib/fondsancien/homefa.html

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