Wednesday, October 17, 2007

Totentanz Blockbook

Totentanz blockbook w


Totentanz blockbook v


Totentanz blockbook u



Totentanz blockbook s



Totentanz blockbook q


Totentanz blockbook p


Totentanz blockbook o



Totentanz blockbook m



Totentanz blockbook k



Totentanz blockbook g


Totentanz blockbook f


Totentanz blockbook e


Totentanz blockbook d


Totentanz blockbook a


Totentanz blockbook


Totentanz blockbook x


In 15th century Europe, a blockbook was a codex ('gathered volume') in which the text and illustration was printed onto a page from a single block of wood. The wood was engraved (xylography) and gouged out leaving the text and images as raised reliefs which were then inked and placed onto a double sheet of wetted paper.

Before the use of presses, the ink transfer was achieved by rubbing the verso of the paper with a round burnishing tool. The paper was printed on one side only because the rubbing would have ruined the original inked surface on the initial sheet. The pages of the blockbook were folded and assembled, with two printed pages followed by two blanks. The blanks were then glued together giving a continuous book as we know it.

In an age where both literacy and the quest for knowledge was on the increase, the blockbook system appears from this distance to have been a great advance over the earlier painstaking manuscript copying in scriptoriums. The process was cheap (but paper was expensive) and allowed for a form of mass production once the wood blocks had been engraved. As for downsides, carving both text and illustrations in a backwards form (so that when inked and rubbed they would be reversed and appear legibly) was technically demanding and more importantly, the blocks were only useful for one double-page from one book of course.

This relief printing technique had been first seen in Europe in Holland, probably as early as 1420, in playing cards and devotional religious images which had brief captions below the illustrations. The history of development from cards to books is hazy at best due to a dearth of surviving original material, but the blockbook format had its heyday between about 1450 and 1475. The works most closely associated with the technique were the Poor Man's Bible ('Biblia Pauperum'), the biblical Apocalypse story, 'Ars Moriendi' (the Art of Dying) and 'Speculum Humanae Salvationis' (the Mirror of Human Salvation).

But Gutenberg's moveable type printing appeared in 1455 and, like betmax video or the netscape navigator browser of modern times, blockbook printing was eventually made redundant by the appearance of a better technology.

The images above are the oldest known book illustrations of the danse macabre/totentanz/dance of death genre, which had begun in France earlier in the 15th century as a visual response to the effects of the plague. The blockbook of twenty six illustrations was produced between 1455 and 1458 in Germany and depicts the traditional hierarchy of victims - such as Pope, monarchy, clergy, knight, farmer, infirmed, mother and child - visited by death and accompanied by a moralising snatch of verse on the inevitability of the subject's mortality. The illustrations are hand coloured.

5 comments:

Sylvia said...

Thanks for the explanation. I'm reading a book on the history of books and it sort of glosses over the block printing part.

Looks like the nun is the only one happy to go with Death. :)

peacay said...

I think she's smiling because she has a cunning and devious plan for escape.

Karla said...

Quite the beguiling-looking collection of jolly deaths...

Do we have any clue as to the nature of the nun's cunning and devious plan?

wingzerozeroone said...

is it possible to get a word for word copy of the german text?

peacay said...

I presume yes (although I don't know if there were various versions or a core text for the genre and/or whether this particular manuscript followed a tradition or was unique in that way). As to where.... that would be a matter for some serious searching.

I would start by asking the folks at the source site: Heidelberg Uni: digitalisierung@ub.uni-heidelberg.de

Good luck.

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